Loading indicators

Loading overlays are a great way to let your users know that something is happening in the background.

Loading Overlays: A Guide

Loading overlays are a great way to let your users know that something is happening in the background. They can be used to indicate that a page is loading, a form is submitting, or a file is downloading.

In this guide, we’ll cover everything you need to know about loading overlays, from getting started to best practices and examples.

Getting Started

The first step in using loading overlays is to decide what type of overlay you want to use.

There are several options available, including modal windows, spinners, and progress bars. Each type of overlay has its own advantages and disadvantages, so it’s important to choose the one that best fits your needs.

Once you’ve chosen the type of overlay you want to use, you’ll need to decide how you want to implement it. You can either use a library or create your own custom overlay.

Libraries are great for quickly adding an overlay to your project, but they may not offer the customization options you need. If you want more control over the look and feel of your overlay, creating your own custom overlay is the way to go.

This is an example of a loading overlay. You can see content loading behind the loader.

How To

Once you’ve chosen the type of overlay and decided how you want to implement it, you’ll need to add the code to your project.

If you’re using a library, you’ll need to include the library’s code in your project. If you’re creating your own custom overlay, you’ll need to write the code for it.

Once the code is in place, you’ll need to add the overlay to the page or element you want it to appear on.

Once the overlay is in place, you’ll need to decide how you want to trigger it. You can either trigger it manually, or you can use a library or custom code to trigger it automatically when certain conditions are met.

For example, you can trigger a loading overlay when a page is loading, or when a form is submitting.

Best Practices

When using loading overlays, there are a few best practices to keep in mind.

First, make sure the overlay is visible and easy to understand. If the overlay is too small or too complex, users may not understand what it’s for. Second, make sure the overlay is not intrusive.

If the overlay takes up too much of the screen, it can be distracting and annoying.

Finally, make sure the overlay is not too slow. If the overlay takes too long to appear, users may think the page is not loading or the form is not submitting.

Examples

  • Modal window: A modal window is a full-screen overlay that appears when a page is loading or a form is submitting. It typically contains a message and a progress bar.
  • Spinner: A spinner is a small animation that appears when a page is loading or a form is submitting. It typically contains a message and a rotating animation.
  • Progress bar: A progress bar is a graphical representation of the progress of a task. It typically contains a message and a bar that fills up as the task progresses.

These are just a few examples of loading overlays. There are many more options available, so be sure to explore all of your options before deciding which one is best for your project.

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